shortbutfast (shortbutfast) wrote in on_culture,
shortbutfast
shortbutfast
on_culture

Obesity Rates by Country

Obesity Rates by Country



Rank  Countries  Amount 
# 1  United States:30.6% 
 
# 2  Mexico:24.2% 
 
# 3  United Kingdom:23% 
 
# 4  Slovakia:22.4% 
 
# 5  Greece:21.9% 
 
# 6  Australia:21.7% 
 
# 7  New Zealand:20.9% 
 
# 8  Hungary:18.8% 
 
# 9  Luxembourg:18.4% 
 
# 10  Czech Republic:14.8% 
 
# 11  Canada:14.3% 
 
# 12  Spain:13.1% 
 
# 13  Ireland:13% 
 
# 14  Germany:12.9% 
 
= 15  Portugal:12.8% 
 
= 15  Finland:12.8% 
 
# 17  Iceland:12.4% 
 
# 18  Turkey:12% 
 
# 19  Belgium:11.7% 
 
# 20  Netherlands:10% 
 
# 21  Sweden:9.7% 
 
# 22  Denmark:9.5% 
 
# 23  France:9.4% 
 
# 24  Austria:9.1% 
 
# 25  Italy:8.5% 
 
# 26  Norway:8.3% 
 
# 27  Switzerland:7.7% 
 
= 28  Japan:3.2% 
 
= 28  Korea, South:3.2% 
 
 Weighted average:14.1%  
 

DEFINITION: Percentage of total population who have a BMI (body mass index) greater than 30 Kg/sq.meters (Data for Australia, Austria and Portugal is from 2002. All other data is from 2003). Obesity rates are defined as the percentage of the population with a Body Mass Index (BMI) over 30. The BMI is a single number that evaluates an individual's weight status in relation to height (weight/height2, with weight in kilograms and height in metres). For Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States, figures are based on health examinations, rather than self-reported information. Obesity estimates derived from health examinations are generally higher and more reliable than those coming from self-reports, because they preclude any misreporting of people's height and weight. However, health examinations are only conducted regularly in a few countries (OECD).

SOURCE: OECD Health Data 2005
Tags: americans, australia, europe, europeans, germany, health, japan, korea, mexico, stereotypes, usa, worldwide
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    Anonymous comments are disabled in this journal

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

  • 1 comment